Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade – Part 2: Parade

As reported in the previous post, and against all reason, we went into the cold night air to look at a bunch of balloons moored with giant nets, in anticipation of one of the world’s most famous and enduring public spectacles: the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

So, with the temperature hovering around 20 degrees F and winds of unknown but predicted seriously dangerous to people and possibly the balloons, we left home with high hopes. Our apartment building is almost exactly .25 miles from Columbus Circle around which the parade was reputed to pass on its way from the Upper West Side at West 77th Street to its destination at 6th Avenue and West 34th Street where sits … Macy’s Department Store. More about Macy’s in a future post.

Understand that the Macy’s website should be/must be the most precise and authoritative place to find information about the parade. It said that there was “no public viewing” of the parade at Columbus Circle. Yet, when we arrived there, hundreds or thousands of people were arrayed around the police barricades set up to keep viewers from interacting with the parade. Concerned that the police might clear the area at any time (“no public viewing”), we set out to find a place from which to watch and take some photos.

Aha! You can’t cross most of the streets in the area. They are blocked up with more barricades. The City of New York must hold an inventory of literally thousands of these gray aluminum contraptions that they haul out for every disruptive event in the city (they occur on average every week somewhere – street fairs, parades, protest marches, etc.). Anyway, keep walking away from the parade route to find a place to cross the street to find a place to watch the parade. We arrive finally in the middle of a crowd stacked up on 7th Avenue with a view of sorts of West 59th Street, the path of the parade after its circumnavigation of Columbus Circle.

From this place we could indeed see the giant balloons as they passed, although the band members (biggest bands in the world, comprised of seemingly hundreds of performers) could only be seen only if they were wearing tall hats or playing tubas. We also encountered my favorite kinds of people with whom to watch a parade. Some of them had camped out there since well before the parade started and left their folding chairs open so as to prevent other people from standing there. Others, including a particularly tall young man to my right, believed they could not be out on the streets of New York without a full backpack of … something. Every time this young man turned to speak to his friends behind him, his backpack collided with me. He never noticed this until I decided to stop being pushed aside and stood my ground. Still, he did not seem to notice that now he could not just swing around whenever he pleased. He actually had to turn his head. Victory was mine!

Meanwhile, the parade continued and we saw a lot of wonderful, gigantic balloons being pulled/handled/managed by teams of many people holding cables/ropes as best they could. The predicted wind did not seem to be a major factor and the crowd was so packed together after a while that their collective body heat effectively fought off the 21-degree air.

After more than an hour of this, we decided that coffee was in order, so we left to find same at one of the ubiquitous Dunkin’ Donuts shops on West 57th, then repaired toward Columbus Circle to return home. However, by now, for reasons not clear, a large percentage of the crowd had left the Circle and we were able to watch the last quarter of the parade there. This included the Grinch balloon, the Singing Christmas Tree and, of course, Santa Claus and his reindeer at the end. So, below is a gallery of photos that I hope you, who had more sense than we, will enjoy from the warmth of your post-Thanksgiving holiday.

I actually do recommend that anyone in New York City at this time of year should make the effort, and it will be an effort, to see the parade. Once may well be enough, but it is indeed a spectacle to remember.

2 thoughts on “Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade – Part 2: Parade

  1. Thank you for the photos!
    I always wished one year the Coxs would make it to NY to see the Macy’s parade. Glad you both got to experienced it. Not sure I can deal with all that “effort”. Mahalo!

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    1. It was a lot of effort, but that is true of so many things here. There are so many people and so much going on that excites them, it’s a wonder that real work gets done too!

      Hope you guys are prospering. Best to everyone.

      Paul

      Paul M Ruden Blog: ShiningSeaUSA.com Blog: AutumnInNewYork.net

      >

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