Summer in Central Park

Summer this year did not begin for us until June 1. We had been in lockdown from March 13 and did not venture out except to pick up packages a few times a week from our concierge desk. There were also a couple of short walks for medical tests, which, in my case, were denied. Readers probably know that my wife was very ill with COVID for a good two really horrible weeks. My experience was comparatively mild though the taste/smell issues have lingered to this day.

So, when June 1 arrived, we were relatively healthy again and the city was beginning to “re-open” in stages. Governor Cuomo was, and remains, very cautious to avoid restarting the horrors that New York City in particular experienced. Good for him and us. Central Park, which has always been a key attraction for us, become an “essential fix.” We started walking every day and most times visited the park. I took my camera sometimes to record the evolution of re-opening as New Yorkers came out to recover. This post reflects a partial synthesis of what we have seen.

We start with July 4, when the city promised fireworks from the top of, among others, the Empire State Building of which we have a direct view from our 50th floor aerie. The result was an overblown dud, but given the circumstances, we were fortunate to see anything at all. Here, then, are a few shots of that experience:

There are quite a few animals in Central Park, although sightings are relatively rare. I suspect none of these will surprise you:

The Park attracts a diverse audience for diverse purposes. Various forms of relaxation abound, often leading to visitors nodding off:

There are, of course, many more active pursuits, some of which are surprisingly common, though not all:

And there are plenty of just plain “scenes” that capture the eye and the imagination:

Finally, saving the best for last, there are the birds. We have learned that, during the course of a year, the Park attracts some 200 species of birds. Many are “tropical” birds that traverse the United States when flying to and from feeding/nesting grounds in the far north and the tropics. These can be seen by astute observers during their stopovers in the woods, lakes and streams in this oasis within the metropolis. Some of them are so gloriously beautiful that we have become involuntary “birders,” that more than a bit obsessive clan of people you often see carrying long lenses and binoculars/note pads peering into the trees and bushes for the sight of something small and cautious or studying the waters for the stunning sight of the Great Egrets that fish there. There are predatory hawks and tiny thrushes. Happily, my wife has a very sharp eye for animals in the wild and I take an occasional nice photo, so, birders we have become, for better or worse. We have watched the stunning documentary entitled “Birders: The Central Park Effect,” available through Amazon Prime. As birthday presents this year, I now own the “Birds of Central Park,” a gorgeous book of bird photos, as well as “Seeing Central Park,” a beautiful guide to the varied and fascinating places of interest.

So with that background, here are some of the results of our partial summer in the Park:

And, finally, wait for it ….

 

 

7 thoughts on “Summer in Central Park

  1. Paul, I really enjoyed this post, especially the woman with the horn and the duck “butt”!!

    Glad you are getting to know th City in such a different way. I lived there in 1986 directly out SMU for a year, and have such fond and interesting memories that I think about all of the time. The number of Peanut butter sandwiches I ate on the steps of the Public library due to my very limited funds 1st come to mind…

    Ali

    Ali Howell alihowell1223@gmail.com http://www.facebook.com/aliandbird 404-918-5956

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    1. I’m glad you liked it. More to come but I first have to turn to the other blog for some serious pushback on the so-called “fact checking” of the DNC by the Washington Post & CNN. You guys stay safe.

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  2. This album, from a very observant team, gave me great joy. Thank you for sharing, especially since shelter-in-place does not facilitate close encounters with urban flora and fauna.

    Like

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