Never a Dull Moment — Year One in Review

New Years Day dawned unseasonably warm in New York City, with temperatures in the upper 50s and now the sun has emerged to add an almost festive aura to the first day of the rest of our lives. We have completed a full year in The City and thought it appropriate to review what we have done besides working and resisting [if interested in the latter, go to http://www.shiningseausa.com]. To put it mildly, 2018 was an extraordinary time for us. Here are some of the experiences we had.

As is well known, New York is a “walking city,” meaning that one walks to get most places. And walk, we did. Personally, I averaged 1.8 miles per day. Other data from those walks:

2,356  – Dog poop/pee avoided (there are bazillion dogs of every description here and few places to “go” but the sidewalks and streets, so they do)

242 – Days with unpredictable/unpredicted weather events

            17 – People who asked me for directions

    14 – Number of times I gave accurate directions

      3 – Number of people never heard from again

Other experiences:

DANCE COMPANIES

Continuum Contemporary/Ballet – see https://autumninnewyork.net/2018/06/18/ballet-bryant-park/

Paul Taylor Dance Company

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater – Wife takes ballet lessons there

BALLETS

American Ballet Theater’s Firebird & AFTERITE

New York City Ballet’s Jewels

New York City Ballet’s Nutcracker

BROADWAY & OFF

Miss Saigon

Waitress

Band’s Visit

Book of Mormon

My Fair Lady

Avenue Q

King Kong

MARCHES

Women’s March

Families Together

March For Our Lives

JAZZ

Cyrus Chestnut

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra

Bill Charlap

Chris Potter

Warren Wolf

SF Jazz Collective

OTHER MUSIC

Brandon Niederauer

MUSEUMS/ART

Photoville Brooklyn

Whitney

Natural History

Jerome Robbins at Lincoln Center Library

EVENTS & OTHER STUFF

High Line

Oculus & One World Observatory

U.S. Open

National Geographic Encounter: Ocean Odyssey

Chelsea Market

New York City Marathon

Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade Balloon Inflation

Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade

Ferry around Manhattan

Mets baseball game

Yankees game

Central Park Zoo

New York Botanical Garden

Central Park Zoo

Feast of San Gennaro

Christmas Lights/Windows/Rockefeller Center Tree

Street Fairs – several

Movies – several with reserved seats!

Stephen Colbert Late Show

Extras in a short indie movie: “Howard,” not yet released – see https://www.facebook.com/HowardTheMovie/

FAVORITE RESTAURANTS
Bricco – neighborhood Italian, small, quiet, great food

Greek Kitchen

SURPRISES

Mandarin Duck in Central Park

Lots of visits from out-of-town friends

This morning we walked in Central Park again and mused about how it felt like spring. Obviously we were intoxicated by the warmth. The crowds were small, likely because the one million people who spent New Years Day and night in Times Square were at home and unconscious. So it goes. We look forward to this 2019 with optimism – there is so much left to do. We hope to see some symphonies and other purely musical performances, and, of course, more ballets.

Happy New Year!

Sign of the Times, Just Rude … or Both?

I have played Mr. Nice Guy about New York City for almost a year now, and that has been genuine. I actually do enjoy living here. At times though, it’s like being a menhaden or other schooling fish. You go where the other fish go and try to stay out of their way when they, driven by mysterious forces, suddenly decide to change direction. If you prefer a flocking bird metaphor, that’s fine too.

So, it’s time to unload a few frustrations. I’m pretty sure these are not unique to New York. I am reliably advised that Washington DC has similar issues but, having lived in the Virginia suburbs for several decades, I mostly steered clear of DC.

There are four things: blocking the sidewalk, wearing giant backpacks on the subway, removing shoes at the ballet and, last but certainly not least, making out during a Broadway show.

First, the sidewalks. Even people who’ve never been here have seen enough movies to know that NYC is crowded. There are people everywhere, often in large numbers, and they are usually in a hurry. Yesterday, a Sunday, the area around Macy’s and Herald Square was mobbed. I have written about the rushing before, but this issue is about … not rushing. It’s about people who are walking along and suddenly stop to look at a life-changing text message … or to send one they just thought of – or to catch up on the news, or, more likely, to check again since the last time five minutes ago to see if a friend has posted anything new on Facebook or Instagram. These people seem to be oblivious to the fact that there are other people trying to use the same sidewalk to which they have now staked an adverse possession (legal term, sorry) claim. Another variation occurs at the city’s numerous hotels when departing guests, waiting for their rides, park their suitcases in the middle of the sidewalk while they chat, smoke or, yet again, check their phones for incoming messages of earth-shattering importance while ignoring the other pedestrians just trying to get somewhere. There oughta be a law.

Second, I get the idea that people want to carry a lot of stuff when moving around the city. People need their work papers and, of course, laptops, iPads and other “devices.” I also see a lot of water bottles (in case there is a water shortage) and enough “stuff” to support a Himalayan expedition. If you have to carry all that stuff, take the damn thing off and place it between your feet or clutch it to your chest. Anything but occupying the space of two people when, as is often the case, there is only room for one-half a person in the first place. I think the city should revise its passenger counts for subway usage to include an extra person for every large backpack. The data would then show that more people used the subway than could possibly fit in the total available space unless they were stacked in their like logs. Well, they often are.

Third, and now we’re getting down to the serious stuff, there is removal of shoes at the ballet. Admittedly, I have only seen this once (at Lincoln Center, mind you; Lincoln Center!!), but it has stuck with me like a bad dream ever since:

I suspect this person was sending the message, “see my damaged feet? I’m a dancer too.” But, to quote Rhett Butler, frankly, madam, I don’t give a damn. I didn’t pay all that money to look at your bare feet during the performance.  Or during intermission, or any other time, for that matter. Keep your bare feet to yourself. Please!

Finally, and this one was probably more disturbing than the others combined because it went on, and on …  and on. We went to see the Broadway musical King Kong. I wrote a blog post about the show which was wonderful. The couple sitting in front of us, estimated to be in their late 20’s or early 30’s, could not keep their hands off of each other. They were snuggling, kissing and hugging, and whispering in each other’s ears, throughout the show. He repeatedly put his arm around her, then after a bout of whatever, made a big show of removing his arm, swinging it up in front of my face.

They were oblivious to everyone around them, implying that they behave this way in public all the time. Yet, every time Kong appeared or did something spectacular, the young man hooted and yelled like he was in a country bar. And the guy was incredibly tall so all the sideways movement as he and his lovely came together and separated left me constantly shifting in my seat to see around his moving head. The people behind me could not have been happy either. Then, at the end of the show and while the curtain was still descending, the pair was out of their seats like a shot, not willing to take even a minute to participate in the standing ovation so richly deserved by the cast.

So, there it is. I feel better. I think. Maybe not. Continuing the Gone With the Wind theme, Vivien Leigh famously said, “tomorrow is another day.” It is, but will it be better? It will. We have tickets to The Band’s Visit and the Nutcracker. And it’s a new ballet season. Does Amazon sell blinders for humans?